PERSUASIVE SPEECH OUTLINE – Use Template Attched

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PERSUASIVE SPEECH OUTLINE – Use Template Attched

Sample and template

Persuasive Speech Outline Template

Your Name:

COMS 101 Section ___

Date Due:

Organization: Identify your outline pattern here. Your only option for this speech is Problem-Solution (see the textbook, pp. 220–221).

Audience analysis: Provide a description of your audience (e.g., its demographics like age, gender, ethnicity, etc. as well as any other information about them that impacts the way you plan and present the speech (see the textbook, pp. 137–145).

Topic: In 1 or 2 sentences, identify the social problem for which you aim to prescribe a redemptive remedy in this speech (see the Persuasive Speech Guidelines document).

General Purpose: To persuade (see p. 98)

Specific Purpose: To inform the audience about [identify the topic here], and to persuade them that [identify a person, group of persons, organization, government, etc.] should do something [state what this is—provide an action verb here that describes, as specifically as possible, the outcome you are promoting through this speech] in response to this information. (see p. 98)

I. Attention-getter

Use an attention-getter to introduce the topic (see the textbook, pp. 238–239, 242–247).

II. Motive for Listening

Show the audience how this topic relates to them (see the textbook, p. 240).

III. Credibility Statement

Identify the credentials or experiences that qualify you to address this topic as an authority (see the textbook, p. 240).

IV. Thesis Statement

Present your thesis statement—a statement that encapsulates your speech’s main idea—here. State it as 1 complete sentence (subject, verb, complete thought).

 

V. Preview Statement

Present your preview statement here (see the textbook, p. 240). Briefly explain that you will now validate or prove the thesis by presenting Main Point 1 (state it), Main Point 2 (state it), Main Point 3 (state it), etc. Be sure to list each of the body section’s main points, in the order you will cover them.

Transition: Use a word, phrase, or sentence to notify your audience that you now will support your thesis by presenting the main points in their stated order and in greater detail (see the textbook, pp. 222–224).

Body:

I. Main Point 1. State it as 1 complete, declarative sentence. Works with the other main points to develop the purpose statement. Be sure it consists with the chosen organizational pattern you identified above.

A. An example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quote from an expert or other supportive material that supports or illustrates Main Point 1 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).

B. Another example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quote from an expert or other supportive material that supports or illustrates Main Point 1 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).

C. If needed, another example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quotes from an expert, or other supportive material that supports or illustrates Main Point 1 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).

Transition: Use a word, phrase, or sentence to notify your audience that you are now transitioning from your first main point to your second main point (see the textbook, pp. 222–224).

II. Main Point 2. State it as 1 complete, declarative sentence. Works with the other main points to develop the purpose statement. Be sure it consists with the chosen organizational pattern you identified above.

A. An example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quote from an expert or other supportive material that supports or illustrates Main Point 2 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).

B. Another example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quote from an expert or other supportive material that supports or illustrates Main Point 2 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).

C. If needed, another example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quotes from an expert, or other supportive material that supports or illustrates Main Point 2 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).

Transition: Use a word, phrase, or sentence to notify your audience that you are now transitioning from your second main point to your third main point (see the textbook, pp. 222–224).

III. Main Point 3. State it as 1 complete, declarative sentence. Works with the other main points to develop the purpose statement. Be sure it consists with the chosen organizational pattern you identified above.

A. An example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quote from an expert or other supportive material that supports or illustrates Main Point 3 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).

B. Another example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quote from an expert or other supportive material that supports or illustrates Main Point 3 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).

C. If needed, another example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quotes from an expert, or other supportive material that supports or illustrates Main Point 3 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).

Other Main Points: These are optional, depending on the needs of your speech. If you use them, they function in the same way as the preceding points.

Transition: Use a word, phrase, or sentence to notify your audience that you are now transitioning into your conclusion (see the textbook, pp. 222–224).

Conclusion:

I. Summary

Summarize your presentation’s main points (see the textbook, pp. 250–251). Your wording should be very similar to the wording you used when previewing the main points in the introduction section and when presenting the main points in the body section.

II. Call to Action

Restate your thesis in a way that tells the audience, explicitly, how they should respond to it (see p. 252).

III. Refocus Audience Attention (see the textbook, pp. 254–255).

Punctuate your speech’s thesis with an illustration, a quote, or a metaphor that makes it more memorable.

or References (if APA)

Using, APA style, present an alphabetized, properly formatted list of any sources that you cited parenthetically in the outline. For a helpful online guide to proper formatting in each of these styles, see the Hacker Handbooks “Research and Documentation” site via this link (right-click and select “Open Hyperlink”). For automated source formatting assistance, see Landmarks Citation Machine via this link (right-click and select “Open Hyperlink”).

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PERSUASIVE SPEECH OUTLINE – Use Template Attched was first posted on July 25, 2019 at 4:50 pm.
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